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  Blast glass Blast Resistant Glass

    Bast Proof Resistant Glass Panel

Architectural Armour have experience providing solutions for blast resistant windows using standard or enhanced multi-laminates.  Typically our blast glass is also bullet resistant so the product can withstand the fragmentation as well as the blast pressure.

Our clients request blast windows and doors in a variety of performance levels, C15, C20 & C30 ,  EXV for vehicle bombs, SB for satchel bombs, PSI and more.  Peak blast pressure and overpressure are technically measured in several units, common units are kPa (Kilopascals) PSI (Pounds per Square Inch).  Alternatively we may see kPa-msec.  This is telling us the pressure and for how long it will ‘push’ against the window.  This is referred to as an ‘Impulse’ load.  Please see blast technical specifications for testing methods.

As the framing of blast glass is critical to its overall performance  customers typically purchase windows, which you can see more on here Blast Resistant Windows

For more information on our options and to discuss you requirements further please contact us via email or telephone; mailto:info@architecturalarmour.com  or +44(0) 1981 257000.

 

 

 

  

Testing Overview

The purpose of blast-resistant glazing is to reduce the risk of injury to building occupants.  The performance of the blast-resistant glazing has to be validated by testing evidence.  The first design step is to define the explosive loading.  This is best specified as blast pressure and impulse, which can be derived from a charge weight and standoff.  This is often described as the threat.

In designing blast-resistant glazing, it is usually accepted that some degree of damage to the glass is almost inevitable.  The second design step is to agree the acceptable risk within the building.  This is normally specified as the acceptable hazard level. Glazing refers to both windows and glazed facade systems.  It is important to consider the window or facade as a system.  This includes the glass, the gasket or sealant, the frame, the fixing of the frame, and the support system.

The blast pressure is applied to the whole area of the window or facade and the behaviour of the glass is dependent on the pane size. The loads on the support system and its performance are also dependent on the size of the glass pane(s).  If glass is tested in a rigid frame, the stresses in the glass are maximised as are the loads in the frame’s fixings.  However, if the glass is mounted in a frame with gaskets or sealants, the system’s flexibility tends to reduce the stresses in the glass and the fixings.

blast glass after testing

Blast Technical Specifications

GSA-TS01:2003     Standard Test Method for Glazing and Window Systems Subject to Dynamic Overpressure Loadings

EN 13541                   Glass in building - Security glazing - Testing and classification of resistance against explosion pressure 

EN 13123-2               Windows, doors and shutters - Explosion resistance - Requirements and classification

ISO 16933:2007  Glass in Building -- Explosion-Resistant Security Glazing -- Test & Classification for Arena Air-Blast Loading

Hazard level

As mentioned above, in explosion testing, it is accepted that some degree of damage to the glass is almost inevitable.  The purpose of blast-resistant glazing is to reduce the risk of injury to the building’s occupants.  Blast leakage, minor damage and glass fragments are allowed as long as they do not exceed specified criteria.  As standards have been developed, these criteria have become better defined.

EN 13541:2012 does not allow any holes (breakthrough from the attack to the protective face) in the glass or between the glass and the frame.  It permits an additional designation of splinters (S) or no splinters (NS) to be awarded.  Splintering is defined as cracking of the rear (protective) face or small fragments (glass dust) being launched from the rear face.

EN 13124-1:2001 and EN 13124-2:2004 do not allow any opening that can be penetrated with a stiff rod of 10 millimetres (mm) in diameter.  No part of the frame or gaskets can become detached.  As in EN 13541:2012, splintering needs to be identified and registered as S or NS.

GSA-TS01:2003 adopted the United Kingdom (UK) hazard-rating levels with minor modifications.  This rating system is based on the projection of the glazing debris into a 3 metre (m) deep cubicle.

In ISO 16933:2007 and ISO 16934:2007 more sophisticated hazard criteria were adopted.  Finally, these standards allow a classification into hazard levels with regard to the observed damage.  The UK hazard-rating levels were adapted to include better definitions of allowable fragments and permitted pull-out of the glass from the frame.

Blast Products

Ballistic and Blast Guard Houses                       Modular New Build or Upgrading existing. EN1522/3 FB2 to FB7 , NIJ 0108.01 LII to IV UL 752

Security Counters and Screens                           Physical, Ballistic or Blast Resistant Counters for any application to keep staff secure

Ballistic Vents/Louvres                                           Bespoke products designed to allow passage of air whilst offering bullet and blast protection

Explosion Vents and Rupture Panels               Safety devices used to contain an explosive blast effect within a building.

Blast Windows                                                            Blast windows to protect against terrorist attacks and longer petrochemical explosions

Blast Resistant Doors                                             Steel manufactured doors offering blast protection to buildings

Bullet Boards                                                             A selection of ballistic grade walling sheets 

Blast Specifications

GSA-TS01:2003     Standard Test Method for Glazing and Window Systems Subject to Dynamic Overpressure Loadings

EN 13541                   Glass in building - Security glazing - Testing and classification of resistance against explosion pressure 

EN 13123-2               Windows, doors and shutters - Explosion resistance - Requirements and classification

ISO 16933:2007  Glass in Building -- Explosion-Resistant Security Glazing -- Test & Classification for Arena Air-Blast Loading

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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